Thursday, April 17, 2014

Aww come on spring...take your meds!



Welcome back to another episode of Lost in the Farmer’s Market. As you may have noticed the weather has been oddly cold the last few days due to a cold front that of course arrived and created that super torrential thunderstorm plus downpour the other day. For note this week’s precipitation was an average of 2.45”. Ironically about 1.45” of that fell in the thunderstorm specifically so we’re darn well watered.  After such rain events things tend to green up and so for today's blog post, I decided to rove about the garden and take snapshots of everything in bloom right after the storm.


Just in time for easter!

That’s right here is a picture snapped just yesterday. For the longest time I was sure I had a single wild rabbit that visited the property, but as you can see, there's this little one in the picture and above him one in the grass trying to hide behind some foliage.  I realized moments after that I literally had a flotilla of rabbits. Moments later rabbit number three came out of the bushes beside the driveway. That’s three confirmed rabbits and a probable one or two more. What blows my mind about this is that they do not damage any of the crops, they just seem to like the fact I don’t pull weeds so they instead just eat them. More so this group comes through between five and six pm every day and take the same route. They go up the driveway, across the yard, into the shady rock garden for a bit then under the fence into the neighbor’s yard. In the process they drive the neighbor’s dog crazy but most of all they never damage anything. So I’ve got a batch of well-behaved wild rabbits that seem not to mind me milling about. There is also the rabbit I often see at night around ten to eleven pm that hides a little less. You saw that rabbit hanging out in the reinforced mound bed during the snow storm when I stumbled upon him and he let me snap his picture. The question is, is the night rabbit of the same group or do I have several groups of rabbits passing through? Regardless of the answer, still very cool I am about one endangered species from being a wild life refuge.


Bunias orientalis – Warty Cabbage / Turkish Rocket
Last year I sold Turkish rocket at the market and this is what a second year plant looks like in spring.  As you can see its leaves are rather uniquely shaped and the plant is much larger than the first year despite black magic application. It did go dormant in the winter briefly during that super cold period but it as has also created its own mounded earth. More study of this perennial leaf green is underway to determine how productive it could be now that it‘s established.


Loropetalum chinenese var. rubrum ‘Daruma’ - Fringe Bush
Fringe bushes in bloom are quite the sight. As far as landscaping shrubs the fringe bushes are tough, quick growing and drought tolerant. This specimen is in bloom now and came into my possession as a surplus item. I lacked a good plant for the spot it’s in (driveway) that could withstand the conditions and thus it was put there. Loropetalums in this climate are evergreens that may go partial deciduous in serious winters depending on siting.


A lone white tulip.

Someone at some point planted tulips along the driveway long ago. I honestly do not know who did it bit this little guy comes up yearly and generally is all foliage with no flower. The super-cold winter probably allowed this bulb to develop more along the lines of a more northern climate and thus we have this fine bloom. But hold on to your hats, the fireworks are about to begin!


Double petaled azaleas, hell I had no idea I had these on property.

Salmon-pink azaleas are where it's at.


wait...are the white ones being photobombed by the pink ones?!

Phlox subulata – Creeping Phlox

This last remaining garden phlox plant bravely blooms every spring and struggles through the August drought every year often going dormant before winter. I took pity on it last year and gave it a few hits of black magic and not only has it bloomed like crazy but it has also gotten a bit bigger. Perhaps this ought be a commercial?


Foeniculum vulgare ‘Purpureaum’ – Black Fennel
This stand of four second year Black fennel plants has become a hedgerow unto themselves. If you look at last year’s pictures of this plant they were tall, impressive but now here near this dense in the foliage department. Numerous side-shoots are what produced this effect and indeed they were evergreen most of the winter producing some impressive foliage against slow contrasts. I cannot state this often enough, Fennel plants are ironclad perennials that are entirely edible but also serve as fine ornamentals; they are a garden must have.


Rumex sanguineum – Bloody Dock/ Sorrel
This is an example of bloody dock that has established in a location. Granted it isn’t as big as it could be because the soil is very much lacking you can see the vibrancy of the leaf color and that the leaves are far larger than the ones I’m selling. Well sited sorrel can get impressively large and thus supply a whole lot of leaves for your culinary uses.

The spring’s bounty is always worth exploring, but then again so is the Fayetteville Farmer’s market. While the weather is not going to be all that good this week, I’ll still show up barring the rain coming down side ways at which I figure we will have other more pressing concerns. As you may know, the market is located on 325 Franklin street in the front parking lot of the Fayetteville Transportation Museum. The market runs from 9 am to 1 pm and you can expect to see some of the venders show up with lots of good food. But let’s move right along to the stuff coming to market this week.

Southward Skies: A northern guide to southern Gardening
This is the second edition of my book, which was published using data compiled from several years of test garden operations. It’s written to aid gardeners of all skill levels in successful garden methods that are targeted for the south east but had proven to be a valued resource for gardens across the eastern coast. It’s certainly a good gift for that gardener you know or for yourself if you’d like to have a reliable field guide. The book costs $25.00 and we do take checks for this item, you can even have it signed.

Black Magic Fertilizer
That’s right you’ve heard about it in trials all summer. This specially formulated liquid fertilizer was made and tested at the test gardens using natural ingredients and no chemicals. The result explosive growth, great harvests and of course no environmental side effects! We’re making batches of this stuff to order, at $6.00 per gallon of fertilizer. You can either order it at the market and pick it up the next week or have it delivered to your home in the Fayetteville area for a delivery charge of an additional $2.00.


Vegetables
2x Asparagus, Gallon pot ($6.00)
3x Bloody Dock, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Eggplant, Casper , 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Pepper, Sweet Banana , 3.5” pot ($3.00)
1x Pepper, Pimento, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Pepper, Habanero, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Tomato, Tlacolula, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Tomato, Brown Berry, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Tomato, Blue Berries, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Tomato, Amana Orange, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Tomato, Black Krim, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Tomato, Paul Robeson, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Tomato, Hillbilly Potato Leaf, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Tomato, Cherokee Purple, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Fruits
10x Strawberry- Ozark Beauty, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Herbs
4x Basil-Sweet, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Basil-Thai, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Borage, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Fennel-Black, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
1x Horehound, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Hyssop-White, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lamb’s Ear, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
1x Lavender-Cotton-Green, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Marjoram, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Oregano, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Oregano, Bristol Cross, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
1x Rosemary, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Sage, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Tansy, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Coming Soon:
Potato, Red Norland
Mint
Bee Balm

The end of the plant list also wraps up this accidentally Easter themed episode of Lost in the farmer's Market. As note regarding the night time temperatures, if you have already planted you can always toss a spare towel over any plant you think might get frosted to protect it from springs apparent multiple personality disorder. At the least make sure all exposed plants are well watered  and thing should turn out fine. I might note that basil is incredibly dramatic about cold so just because it's gone a bit limp does not mean you wont have pesto later. Peppers are notorious drama queens about the cold too but they still need some protecting so with that said you know what to do. Hopefully I'll see some of you at the market and as always keep 'em growing!

Thursday, April 10, 2014

April Showers bring....the pollen down.



Welcome to another episode of Lost In the Farmer’s Market, today's episode is sponsored by Coffee! Yes, you know you want to join our Caffeinated Legions!  Ironically this less of a joke then you’d think, most experienced gardeners know that coffee grounds after you’ve made coffee are a useful thing to add to compost as they break down into something resembling less acidic peat moss. More so they are the cheapest “brown” material for your compost possible for the effect they have in darkening soil and leaching caffeine to your drowsy plants. The aforementioned is somewhat of a joke though, realistically their decomposing grounds actually darken soils because they add organic matter and do actually to some degree stain lighter soil components a bit. Plus there’s the bonus of you still having your coffee and getting to drink it too. With that aside we have some spring pictures this week and the beginning of a discussion about garden ecology.

OMG Napa…are you by chance related to canola?!

So first of here we have a Napa Cabbage trying to bolt. Bolting in the case of a plant is a term used to describe any plant with a finite life span (annuals and biennials) that is going to flower and is thus at the end of its life. For note, most members of the cabbage family have a white or yellow bloom, Napa cabbage is yellow clearly whereas Daikon Radish another member of the cabbage family is white flowering. In some cases (Rat-tail radish, broccoli, broccoli rabe and cauliflower) you actually want the plants to bloom because you eat the bloom. In plants such as arugula, lettuce, Swiss chard and spinach blooming is discouraged because the leaves of the plant tend to get bitter after blooming occurs. The act of removing a soon to be flower or a flower after it is no longer pretty is called ‘dead heading’ which the mention of which just now probably excited a lot of grateful dead fans out there. But enough of this cabbage talk; below is the next picture.


Chinese Wisteria – Wisteria sinensis
The picture above demonstrates what all the fuss is about when it comes to Wisteria. Wisteria is positively gorgeous in bloom, which almost makes it’s invasive and prolific habits acceptable. Since Wisteria is in the Pea family it fixes nitrogen somewhat and it’s flowers attract scores of pollinators. I might add the fallen blooms are like high octane compost fuel. The downside is that the seeds of this plant almost always germinate, it puts out runners and can creep into your yard hidden under the pine straw until it decides seemingly at random to sprout and suddenly appear in the middle of a lawn or in a garden bed. Since wisteria is fast growing and hard to kill it can be a problem in your yard for years. This fact has earned wisteria the well-earned title of Invasive plant and ecological threat.


Lemon Verbena – Aloysia citrodora
This is a picture of what I thought was a dead Lemon Verbena plant. In our climate they are tender perennials that may or may not survive the winter. Given the weather this last winter I figured my lemon verbena was a goner for sure. Several times I thought of pulling the plant’s dead remains out and tried once only to discover fire ants had a nest under it. Patience and or laziness won out and it stayed in the ground. To my surprise this is its new growth. The citronella geranium a few feet away in the same bed also is sprouting proving one old saying about plant hardiness. The hardiness of a plant is in its roots, thus if the roots survive so will the rest of the plant most likely. But a lemon verbena that survives winter is bound to be super-vigorous because it’s got a really big root system


Squashes? Melons? Squalons?
I don’t even know what precise plant these are but they are coming up in the new berm and I’ve got no intention of stopping them. I would imagine the likely culprits are acorn, butternut or yellow crookneck squash or a cantaloupe. Either way their willing germination signals that the temperatures are just right which also tells me that is most certainly spring. I’ll have more photos as these little guys develop.

So with the topic of the day filed under ‘completed’ we now move the conversation to other points. The precipitation this week was about 0.3” which is not quite the 1” needed but given prior rainfall it’s ok. As you may know Easter is on the 21st, which is the last theoretical frost date however I’ve personally had pepper and tomato plants out at the gardens for at least the last week so with some careful siting you all out there should be safe. Weather aside this weekend at the market is a pretty big one, the strawberry plants are coming to market. Behind them are the things you’ve asked for specifically basil, peppers, tomatoes and eggplant.

The Fayetteville Farmer’s market is located in downtown Fayetteville on 325 Franklin Street in the front and back lot of the Fayetteville Transportation Museum. There is a ton of parking about the area so don’t worry about fighting over a parking spot. The weather is supposed to be quite nice and if you are not a morning person the Market runs from 9 am to 1 pm sometimes with a little extra if there are a lot of folks at the market. But with timing set aside, here is what I will be bringing to market this week. As I tell folks who visit the booth, the plant list below is not absolute, more often than not there is more than listed. I pack the truck Friday night starting with what is listed and should something look good it may wind up as an early extra item that goes unlisted.

Southward Skies: A northern guide to southern Gardening
This is the second edition of my book, which was published using data compiled from several years of test garden operations. It’s written to aid gardeners of all skill levels in successful garden methods that are targeted for the south east but had proven to be a valued resource for gardens across the eastern coast. It’s certainly a good gift for that gardener you know or for yourself if you’d like to have a reliable field guide. The book costs $25.00 and we do take checks for this item, you can even have it signed.

Black Magic Fertilizer
That’s right you’ve heard about it in trials all summer. This specially formulated liquid fertilizer was made and tested at the test gardens using natural ingredients and no chemicals. The result explosive growth, great harvests and of course no environmental side effects! We’re making batches of this stuff to order, at $6.00 per gallon of fertilizer. You can either order it at the market and pick it up the next week or have it delivered to your home in the Fayetteville area for a delivery charge of an additional $2.00.


Oh yes the production line in action! Goods stuff, what you see here is Radicchio, Borage, Tansy, Oregano and at the far left Marjoram.
House Plants
5x Aloe Vera ($5.00)

Vegetables
5x Dinosaur Kale, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Mustard, India green, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Radicchio, Crimson, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Swiss Chard, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
6x Bloody Dock, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Asparagus, Gallon pot ($6.00)

Fruits
10x Strawberry- Ozark Beauty, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Herbs
2x Fennel-Black, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Horehound, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Hyssop-White, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Lamb’s Ear, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Lavender-Cotton-Green, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Marjoram, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Oregano, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Oregano, Bristol Cross, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Rosemary, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Sage, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Coming Soon:
Tomatoes (16+ varieties)
Eggplant
Peppers
Basil
Potato, Red Norland
Mint
Bee Balm

Well this brings to a close another April episode of Lost in the Farmer’s Market, spring has clearly gone off without incident save for the immense amount of pine pollen this year. Honestly there’s so much yellow drift you’d think the pines had been celibate for a decade or something. But anyway the night time temperatures are looking good folks so you should be safe to transition to summer plants. Just be wary of temperatures at night below 40 degrees and with some care you should have no problem keeping ‘em growing.

Friday, April 4, 2014

And now for something completely different..april



Welcome back to another Episode of lost in the farmer’s market, today we continue the topic of last week with a few springtime photographs and a bit about suspicious individual…in your garden. But before we get to that, let us make with the spring photographs.

Obligatory Pansy bloom, because you know...

Camellias at the ranch.

From the wild flower mix I spread in the crescent garden last year this is some sort of primrose. Which brings to light one fact of using seed mixes, not everything comes up in a timely fashion.


Rabbit eye blueberries blooming, if this is not a sign of spring I don't know what is.

Stellaria Media - Chickweed

Yes you’ve probably seen this one, he’s trouble, you might commonly find him in the cooler seasons lurking. Perhaps he’s in your lawn, or in your newly tilled beds growing, spreading and looking utterly harmless, until suddenly he’s got a firm grasp on the soil and those April showers provide him the water needed to have that growth spurt and then he’s all up in your lettuce strangulating it with its enthusiasm for growing.  This is chickweed, a common garden weed known for its love of the cold season and very short life span.

Now the truth is that chickweed has an undeserved bad rap. As far as weeds go it is an effective anti-erosion plant as its fibrous roots are quite capable of holding the topsoil for a season until something else takes over. It is a fast grower and will tolerate a lot of soil types but is temperature sensitive and will not tolerate the summer’s heat. I figure in intentional cultivation its short life span may not be as much of a problem.  Now what do you use it for? Well Chickweed is 100% edible and is often trimmed with the clippings being used as a salad green. The specimen above was dug from where it was growing in bed and potted in enriched potting soil. Much like the trial a few years back to see what cultivation would do for a fire on the mountain (poinsettia relative) plant which is considered a weed. In shade with good soil and no competition it may be possible that chick weed could be a sustainable salad source. The specimen you see after transplanting wilted for a day then promptly recovered. At least I know it’s vigorous which bodes well for its adaptation perhaps as an edible houseplant. I’ll have more on this as the trial develops.


As you know the Fayetteville Farmer’s Market occurs every Saturday between the hours of 9:00 am and 1:00 pm. This week there is a special event at the market so we will be starting early with a setup time of 8:30. I believe we have a vintage automotive show going on so this week’s market will be off the hook for sure. The weather is supposed to be gorgeous so there’s plenty of reason to stop by and see the sights. The market is located on 325 Franklin Street in downtown Fayetteville and is typically located in the frontal parking lot of the Fayetteville Transportation Museum. With that said the following will be available this week.


Southward Skies: A northern guide to southern Gardening
This is the second edition of my book, which was published using data compiled from several years of test garden operations. It’s written to aid gardeners of all skill levels in successful garden methods that are targeted for the south east but had proven to be a valued resource for gardens across the eastern coast. It’s certainly a good gift for that gardener you know or for yourself if you’d like to have a reliable field guide. The book costs $25.00 and we do take checks for this item, you can even have it signed.

Black Magic Fertilizer
That’s right you’ve heard about it in trials all summer. This specially formulated liquid fertilizer was made and tested at the test gardens using natural ingredients and no chemicals. The result explosive growth, great harvests and of course no environmental side effects! We’re making batches of this stuff to order, at $6.00 per gallon of fertilizer. You can either order it at the market and pick it up the next week or have it delivered to your home in the Fayetteville area for a delivery charge of an additional $2.00.

House Plants
5x Aloe Vera ($5.00)

Garden Plants
4x Dinosaur Kale, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Cabbage, Tatsoi, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Mustard, India green, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lettuce, Freedom Mix, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lettuce, Romaine, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Raddichio, Crimson, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Swiss Chard, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Herbs
4x Green Lavender-Cotton, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Black Fennel, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Sage, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Hyssop, White , 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Bloody Sorrel, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Oregano, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Oregano, Bristol Cross
3x Rosemary, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Horehound, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lamb’s Ear, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Coming Soon:

Some of the strawberry crop, All Ozark Beauty. For note they are everbearing type.
40x Ozark Beauty Strawberry, 3.5” pot ($3.00) ( April 12th)
6x Ozark Beauty Strawberry, 5” pot ($5.00) (April 12th)
10x Martha Washington Asparagus (April 5th)
10x Dark Red Norland Potato (April 5th)
Tomato, Amana Orange
Tomato, Aunt Lou's Underground Railroad
Tomato, Black Krim
Tomato, Blue Berries
Tomato, Brown Berry
Tomato, Hillbilly Potato Leaf
Tomato, Japanese Black Trifele
Tomato, Martino's Roma
Tomato, Paul Robeson
Tomato, Purple Calabash
Tomato, Rainbow Cherry Blend
Tomato, Reisetomate
Tomato, San Marzano
Tomato, Tlacolula

This is the end of the first post of April, and indeed we enter April with a precipitation of 1.5”. April showers and May flowers indeed if that rainfall is any gauge Fayetteville might become flower land in May. There is a supposed cold front coming but I figure that’s about normal; we did get of easy this week so keep an eye out for those night time temperatures. As always folks keep ‘em growing!

Friday, March 28, 2014

All this about March


Welcome back to the last episode of lost in the farmer’s market for March 2014. March as you all know has been a kind of crazy month with the weather being cold, wet, warm or wet and cold and more different cold. Yet April is right there just about a day or two away and I don’t know about you but it’s looking pretty nice! For today’s slightly delayed post I thought I’d break with the planned content and post up a few pictures of spring goodness in action.

So we start with a simple Hyacinth.
For note when it comes to bulbs what you see above is the true Hyacinth in circulation. Hyacinthum orientalis is the only readily circulated member of the hyacinth group. Two other plants are called hyacinths but are not true hyacinths and those are the Grape Hyacinth and the Woodland Hyacinth. Since I do not have a picture of the latter please note that the woodland Hyacinth's scientific name is Endymion hispanicus.


And move the topic to a grape Hyacinth
Grape hyacinths  Muscari neglectum are not nearly as aromatic as their larger cousin the oriental hyacinth and not as prolific as the woodland hyacinth but they are a solid option for planting bulbs in this climate. Paired with white daffodils they have similar bloom times and nice contrasting effect.


But perhaps a peach blossom might suffice for spring
Well the  fruiting trees are blooming so this is a good and definite sign that spring has finally arrived. In this case I think this is a peach bloom but since I focused the picture on the flower but not the rest of the plant the identification details are not clear enough.


Because some of you asked here is a picture of the tomato crop as they are right this moment.
 A few of you asked about tomatoes at the booth and I thought it'd be good to show the crop. This is four of about six trays of tomatoes. All kinds and sorts int heir 3.5" pots and labelled. Most have true leaves and are  perhaps three inches tall  as you can see they've been turned so they're leaning inward away from the sun. Once night time temperatures stabilize and remain at about 50 degrees these guys will go outside for final growing.


As you know the Fayetteville Farmer’s Market occurs every Saturday between the hours of 9:00 am and 1:00 pm. The weather forecast says that there’s a high probability of rain this weekend but barring persistent torrential downpours I plan to still show up anyway. The market is located on 325 Franklin Street in downtown Fayetteville and is typically located in the frontal parking lot of the Fayetteville Transportation Museum.  Given the possibility of rain the market may be condensed around the front entryway to the market and so please look carefully the market may not be as obvious as normal. With that said the following will be available this week.

Southward Skies: A northern guide to southern Gardening
This is the second edition of my book, which was published using data compiled from several years of test garden operations. It’s written to aid gardeners of all skill levels in successful garden methods that are targeted for the south east but had proven to be a valued resource for gardens across the eastern coast. It’s certainly a good gift for that gardener you know or for yourself if you’d like to have a reliable field guide. The book costs $25.00 and we do take checks for this item, you can even have it signed.

Black Magic Fertilizer
That’s right you’ve heard about it in trials all summer. This specially formulated liquid fertilizer was made and tested at the test gardens using natural ingredients and no chemicals. The result explosive growth, great harvests and of course no environmental side effects! We’re making batches of this stuff to order, at $6.00 per gallon of fertilizer. You can either order it at the market and pick it up the next week or have it delivered to your home in the Fayetteville area for a delivery charge of an additional $2.00.

House Plants
1x Dancing Bones Cactus ($3.00)
5x Aloe Vera ($5.00)

Garden Plants
1x Cabbage, Savoy, 1 gallon pot ($3.00)
8x Dinosaur Kale, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Cabbage, Tatsoi, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Mustard, India green, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lettuce, Freedom Mix, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Lettuce, Romaine, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Raddichio, Crimson, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
4x Swiss Chard, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Herbs
3x Green Lavender-Cotton, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Black Fennel, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Sage, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Hyssop, White , 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Bloody Sorrel, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Oregano, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
3x Oregano, Bristol Cross
3x Rosemary, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Horehound, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
1x Tansy, 3.5” pot ($3.00)
2x Lamb’s Ear, 3.5” pot ($3.00)

Coming Soon:
40x Ozark Beauty Strawberry, 3.5” pot ($3.00) ( April 12th)
6x Ozark Beauty Strawberry, 5” pot ($5.00) (April 12th)
10x Martha Washington Asparagus (April 5th)
10x Dark Red Norland Potato (April 5th)
Tomato, Amana Orange
Tomato, Aunt Lou's Underground Railroad
Tomato, Black Krim
Tomato, Blue Berries
Tomato, Brown Berry
Tomato, Hillbilly Potato Leaf
Tomato, Japanese Black Trifele
Tomato, Martino's Roma
Tomato, Paul Robeson
Tomato, Purple Calabash
Tomato, Rainbow Cherry Blend
Tomato, Reisetomate
Tomato, San Marzano
Tomato, Tlacolula

Well this brings to a close the last post of March, I hope you liked the photographs and next week the topic will go back to plants we will be carrying this year.  That is assuming some strange weather phenomenon or some other garden topic does not side track the conversation. We’ve got a few days of warm night time temps in the 40’s up ahead though, and the thunderstorms mean a weather front for our benefit so make sure to take full advantage of it all if you can. As always folks keep ‘em growing!